MICCAI Workshop on Mesh Processing in Medical Image Analysis 2012

October 1  /  In conjunction with MICCAI 2012, Nice, France

Official Website

Summary

MeshMed 2012 is a workshop held in conjunction with MICCAI 2012 in Nice on October 1. The topic of the workshop is broadly based on three overlapping topics: Mesh processing, the image-to-mesh (I2M) pipeline, and surface analysis and extraction. While numerous I2M technologies have been developed, rarely do they get sufficient exposure for out-of-field researchers have the necessary expertise to know the nuances between them. Similarly, researchers in geometry, meshing, and surfacing often consider their problems in independent settings, external to their use in a specific imaging pipeline. In particular, there is a need for designing novel technologies that strictly focus on medical image domains. This workshop proposes to improve the cross-pollination of the imaging and meshing efforts by considering how meshing fits into the end-to-end pipeline from image acquisition to clinical analysis.

Topics

We invite papers on the following (non-exhaustive) list of topics:

  • Mesh representations, generation, extraction, visualisation and processing.
  • Image-to-mesh pre-processing, conversion, and post-processing.
  • Surface representation, extraction, matching, and analysis.

Scope

Many strategies for medical image analysis have been built on an image analysis pipeline that starts with acquired image data, performs filtering and processing, constructs geometric models of important surfaces and structures, performs simulation, and finally provides quantitative and visual analysis of the data. Within this pipeline, geometry and shape are commonly represented as a mesh, or a discretization of some domain into simpler computational elements such as quads or triangles (representative of surface pieces) or tetrahedra and hexahedra (representative of volumetric elements). This image-to-mesh (I2M) step converts volumetric images into formats that are more suitable for solving finite-element simulations, analyzing critical structures, and performing boundary surface visualization tasks. Current research in computational geometry, graphics hardware, and computer graphics has produced methods to represent, extract, refine, visualize and analyze both critical surfaces embedded in the 3D volumes, such as interfaces between tissues, as well as volumetric regions, such as organs.

The workshop investigates the role meshes have with medical image analysis and is broadly based on three overlapping themes:
  • Mesh processing,
  • The I2M pipeline,
  • Surface analysis and extraction.

While numerous I2M technologies have been developed, rarely do they get sufficient exposure so that out-of-field researchers have the necessary expertise to know the nuances between them. Similarly, researchers in geometry, meshing, and surfacing often consider their problems in independent settings, external to their use in a particular pipeline. In particular, there is a need for designing novel technologies that strictly focus on medical image domains. This workshop proposes to improve the cross-pollination of the imaging and meshing efforts by considering how meshing fits into the end-to-end pipeline from image acquisition to clinical analysis.

Organizers

  • Nikos P. Chrisochoides, Old Dominion University, USA
  • Joshua A. Levine, SCI Institute, University of Utah, USA
  • Rasmus R. Paulsen, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
  • Sylvain Prima, IRISA / INRIA Rennes, France
  • Ross T. Whitaker, SCI Institute, University of Utah, USA
  • Yongjie Zhang, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

2012 Chairs

  • Joshua A. Levine, SCI Institute, University of Utah, USA
  • Rasmus R. Paulsen, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
  • Yongjie Zhang, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Program committee

  • Michael Bronstein (University of Lugano, CH)
  • Miguel AG Ballester (ALMA IT Systems, Spain)
  • Jakob Andreas Bærentzen (Technical University of Denmark)
  • Andrey Chernikov (Old Dominion University, USA)
  • Gary Christensen (University of Iowa, USA)
  • Tim Cootes (University of Manchester, UK )
  • Tron Darvann (Copenhagen University, DK)
  • Cindy Grimm (Washington University in St.Louis)
  • Michael Kazhdan (Johns Hopkins University, USA )
  • Sebastian Kurtek (Florida State University, USA)
  • Mads Nielsen (Copenhagen University, DK)
  • Wiro Niessen (Erasmus University Rotterdam, NL)
  • Sebastien Ourselin (University College London, UK)
  • Mauricio Reyes (University of Bern, CH)
  • Daniel Rueckert (Imperial College London, UK)
  • Jonathan Shewchuk (UC Berkeley, USA)
  • Suzanne M. Shontz (Pennsylvania State University, USA)
  • Anuj Srivastava (Florida State University , USA)
  • Martin Styner (UNC Chapel Hill, USA)
  • Lilla Zöllei (Harvard Medical School, USA)
  • Lasse Riis Østergaard (Aalborg University, DK)

Best paper prize

There will be awarded a best paper prize. All accepted papers (orals and posters) are competing. The winner is chosen by the organisers based on relevance, novelty and scientific contribution. The award will be given at the end of the workshop.